All Publications

  • Salt Lake City is tackling issues of fresh and healthy food availability via the Resident Food Equity Advisors. Its goal is to help create an equitable community food system that increases access to healthy, organic, and culturally relevant foods for historically underrepresented and underserved communities. Over the course of a year, the Advisors worked in partnership with City staff to voice their concerns and help shape the City’s food policy agenda.

    Document
  • What can municipal governments (counties, cities and towns), still suffering from all the pain and disruption that COVID has brought to their communities and economies, do now to hasten their recovery and build resilience for the future, while also addressing past inequity? Here are seven essential steps to take, all proven, with real-world examples and implementation examples for each, that complement each other and can be done simultaneously.

  • The U.S. is among the most unequal societies in the world. To address these inequalities, city leaders, including mayors, should play a critical role in community wealth building. This brief profiles three cities, Nashville, Detroit, and Lafayette, LA, on the unique ways that leaders in these cities are building community wealth and their local democratic systems. City leaders, including mayors, are this brief’s intended audience. However, as highlighted in each example, this work requires multiple actors, including community organizers and developers. This brief is useful to anyone committed to equitable economic development in their community.

    Document
  • Aging water infrastructure systems, climate change, and the general rising cost of urban living mean that access to clean and affordable water is becoming a greater challenge. Cities and water utilities are increasingly faced with a major financial dilemma: increase rates to update infrastructure and price out ratepayers, or keep rates static at the expense of aging and failing infrastructure. At the fulcrum of this choice sits those most vulnerable to increases in rates: low-to-moderate income households, which are disproportionately made up of women and/or people of color.

    Document